A Project for Better Journalism chapter
SENIORS! Your senior portraits are due soon. Check out our Flow Page for more information on all things Yearbook!  More →
News

Stress: Introverts, Extroverts, and Others

The source of stress is not only linked to the problems one encounters. Stress can be derived from factors such as one’s own nature. Introversion, and its opposite, extroversion are personality traits that affect how people act and what they do. For example, an introvert would not like to hang out around groups of people that they do not know. They would not like to talk to strangers even more so. Introverts generally are the shy people of the bunch. Extroverts on the other hand are the people who absolutely love to talk and to hang out with people. They are the more energetic and are generally the ones who would initiate a conversation.

That in mind, introverts and extroverts can both become stressed through what they consider is uncomfortable, even if no apparent problem is presented. In a poll I’ve conducted, asking what students in our school are and what makes them stressed, 22% of students said that they were extroverts. These extroverts said that they enjoy going to school, going to the gym, talking to people, listening to music, and many other activities of those natures. Among the activities that made them uncomfortable were not doing anything, and “weird situations”. 66% of students professed that they were introverts. These introverts said they enjoyed listening to music, playing sports, reading, playing video games, sleeping, and many, many more activities of those natures. What made these introverts uncomfortable were people, talking in front of a group of people, people watching, and, funnily enough, taking surveys.

You may be asking, “What about the 11% of students?” Well, it turns out that these 11% of students are ambiverts, people who take on both introverted and extroverted features. These people enjoyed doing activities of both worlds, and, likewise, were made uncomfortable by activities of both worlds as well.

From what could be gathered from the information given, it seems that the tstress is derived from what these people find uncomfortable. These activities drain them of their energy. This leaves the question of how would these people recharge their batteries from this. Among the things that both groups can do is to do the things that they enjoy.

Having said that, there are some similarities between introverts and extroverts. It’s that both enjoyed listening to music, and playing sports. However, there are not any things that they both found uncomfortable, at least for this survey. Despite these very few similarities, introverts and extroverts alike find things that they deem are uncomfortable to deal with and makes them stressed. Also, there is not much one can do about what makes them uncomfortable and what they enjoy. It’s part of what they are as a person, and one cannot change that. What I can say that would help both introverts and extroverts (and ambiverts) is to try to not mind what makes them uncomfortable, and focus on what makes them happy.

The source of stress is not only linked to the problems one encounters. Stress can be derived from factors such as one’s own nature. Introversion, and its opposite, extroversion are personality traits that affect how people act and what they do. For example, an introvert would not like to hang out around groups of people that they do not know. They would not like to talk to strangers even more so. Introverts generally are the shy people of the bunch. Extroverts on the other hand are the people who absolutely love to talk and to hang out with people. They are the more energetic and are generally the ones who would initiate a conversation.

That in mind, introverts and extroverts can both become stressed through what they consider is uncomfortable, even if no apparent problem is presented. In a poll I’ve conducted, asking what students in our school are and what makes them stressed, 22% of students said that they were extroverts. These extroverts said that they enjoy going to school, going to the gym, talking to people, listening to music, and many other activities of those natures. Among the activities that made them uncomfortable were not doing anything, and “weird situations”. 66% of students professed that they were introverts. These introverts said they enjoyed listening to music, playing sports, reading, playing video games, sleeping, and many, many more activities of those natures. What made these introverts uncomfortable were people, talking in front of a group of people, people watching, and, funnily enough, taking surveys.

You may be asking, “What about the 11% of students?” Well, it turns out that these 11% of students are ambiverts, people who take on both introverted and extroverted features. These people enjoyed doing activities of both worlds, and, likewise, were made uncomfortable by activities of both worlds as well.

From what could be gathered from the information given, it seems that the tstress is derived from what these people find uncomfortable. These activities drain them of their energy. This leaves the question of how would these people recharge their batteries from this. Among the things that both groups can do is to do the things that they enjoy.

Having said that, there are some similarities between introverts and extroverts. It’s that both enjoyed listening to music, and playing sports. However, there are not any things that they both found uncomfortable, at least for this survey. Despite these very few similarities, introverts and extroverts alike find things that they deem are uncomfortable to deal with and makes them stressed. Also, there is not much one can do about what makes them uncomfortable and what they enjoy. It’s part of what they are as a person, and one cannot change that. What I can say that would help both introverts and extroverts (and ambiverts) is to try to not mind what makes them uncomfortable, and focus on what makes them happy.

Google+